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UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM

Requirements for the Majors | Requirements for the Minors | Departmental Honors | Capstone Seminar | Advisors | FAQ| Useful Links

The Department of Classics is committed to the study of ancient Greece and Rome and their political, social, artistic, and intellectual legacy. The area of inquiry spans more than two thousand years, from the art and archaeology of the Mediterranean Bronze Age (ca. 1700 B.C.E.) to the breakdown of the Roman empire in Late Antiquity (ca. 400 C.E.). The interdisciplinary nature of the program offers its students a broad range of courses in the fields of language, literature, religion, mythology, philosophy, political history, cultural studies, digital humanities, virtual reality, archaeology, art, and film.

An education in Classics offers a unique perspective on relations between the past and the present and cultivates both breadth of knowledge and precision in writing and thinking. Majors and minors gain linguistic and analytical skills that have proved highly useful for careers in law, medicine, business, communications, academia, and the arts. The department’s commitment to small class sizes at the upper division level and a distinguished faculty actively engaged in undergraduate teaching have led to high levels of student satisfaction and the admission of Classics majors to top-ranked graduate and professional programs. Please click here to learn more about the graduates of our program.

Students may choose majors or minors in the study of the ancient languages (Greek and/or Latin) or Classical Civilization. We offer majors in Classical Civilization, Greek, Latin, and Greek and Latin. We offer minors in Classical Civilization, Greek, and Latin. Minors require three lower and five upper division courses in the appropriate area. All four majors offered by the department have been accredited with Capstone status, in recognition of the excellence of the undergraduate education the department offers to its majors.

To find out more about the Helen Caldwell Awards and Prizes offered by the Classics department, click here.

To find out about current and future classes, please click here for the UCLA Schedule of Classes.

To join the UCLA Classics Students Facebook page, please click here.

To find out more about the UCLA Classical Society, click here.

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS AND MINORS (click here to go to our course descriptions in the UCLA Catalog)

MAJORS

Classical Civilization Major (Summer 2010-present).

Preparation for major: (1) Classics 10 and 20 and two from Classics 30, 40W, 41W, 42, 51A/B, 60, 87GE, or 88GE; (2) Greek 3 or Latin 3 (or Greek 16 or Latin 16).

Major Requirements:  (1) ten upper division courses in the department. (No more than three of these courses may be selected from Greek 100 through 133 or Latin 100 through 133. Classics 198A and 198B may be applied as one course toward the major. Courses in related fields not offered by the department may be substituted by petition and with approval of the undergraduate adviser. Up to two of the following ancient history courses will be automatically approved: History 112A through 112E, 113A, 113B, 114A, 114B, 114C, 115, 116A.); (2) Classics 191. Otherourses in the 190 series may be substituted by petition.

Checklist for the New Major in Classical Civilization

Classical Civilization Pre-Summer 2010 Major

Preparation for major: Classics 10 and 20 and one from Classics 30, 40W, 41W, 42, 51A/B, 87GE, or 88GE.

Major Requirements: (1) Greek 3 or Latin 3; (2) two upper division courses in Greek or Roman history (History 112A through 112E, 113A, 113B, 114A, 114B, 114C, 115, 116A); (3) two upper division courses in classical art or archaeology (Classics C151E, 152A, 152B, M153A through M153K); (4) seven upper division courses in the department (courses in related fields not offered by the department may be substituted by petition and with approval of the undergraduate adviser) — no more than three may be selected from Greek 100 through 133 or Latin 100 through 133, and Classics 198A and 198B may be applied as only one course toward the major; (5) Classics 191. Other courses in the 190 series may be substituted by petition.

Checklist for the Pre-Summer 2010 Major in Classical Civilization

Latin

Preparation for major: Latin 1-3 or 16, Latin 20; Classics 10 and 20.

Major requirements: (1) Seven upper division Latin courses, including course 110. Latin 197 and 199 may be applied by petition. (2) three upper division courses in classical civilization and/or ancient history (History 112A through 112E, 113A, 113B, 114A, 114B, 114C, 115). Courses in related fields not offered by the department may be substituted by petition and with approval of the faculty undergraduate adviser. (3) Classics 191.

Note: Students in the Greek, Latin, and Greek and Latin majors are permitted to take Greek 200A, 200B, 200C and Latin 200A, 200B, 200C with consent of the instructor.

Checklist for the major in Latin

Greek

Preparation for major: Greek 1-3 or 16, Greek 20; Classics 10 and 20.

Major requirements: (1) Seven upper division Greek courses, including course 110. Greek 197 and 199 may be applied only by petition. (2) Three upper division courses in classical civilization and/or ancient history (History 112A through 112E, 113A, 113B, 114A, 114B, 114C, 115). Courses in related fields not offered by the department may be substituted by petition and with approval of the faculty undergraduate adviser. (3) Classics 191.

Note: Students in the Greek, Latin, and Greek and Latin majors are permitted to take Greek 200A, 200B, 200C and Latin 200A, 200B, 200C with consent of the instructor.

Checklist for the major in Greek

Greek & Latin

Preparation for major: Greek 1-3 or 16, Greek 20; Latin 1-3 or 16, Latin 20; Classics 10 and 20.

Major requirements: 1) Four upper division Greek courses and four upper division Latin courses, of which one course must be Greek 110 or Latin 110. Greek and/or Latin 197 and 199 may be applied by petition. (2) three upper division courses in classical civilization and/or ancient history (History 112A through 112E, 113A, 113B, 114A, 114B, 114C, 115). Courses in related fields not offered by the department may be substituted by petition and with approval of the faculty undergraduate adviser. (3) Classics 191.

Checklist for the major in Greek and Latin

 

MINORS

Classical Civilization

Required lower division courses: Classics 10 and 20 and one from Classics 30, 40W, 41W, 42, 51A/B, 60, 87GE, and 88GE.

Required upper division courses: Five upper division courses in Classical Civilization (drawn from Classics M121-185 and 191). One upper division course in Ancient History will be automatically approved by petition. Other courses in related fields may be substituted by petition and with approval of the Faculty Undergraduate Advisor. A minimum of twenty units in the minor must be in addition to units applied toward a major or minor in another department or program.

Checklist for the minor in Classical Civilization

Latin

Required lower division courses: Latin 2 and 3, or Latin 16; Latin 20.

Required upper division courses: Five upper division courses in Latin (Latin 100-133). A minimum of twenty units in the minor must be in addition to units applied toward a major or minor in another department or program.

Checklist for the minor in Latin

Greek

Required lower division courses: Greek 2 and 3, or Greek 16; Greek 20.

Required upper division courses: Five upper division courses in Greek (Greek 100-133). A minimum of twenty units in the minor must be in addition to units applied toward a major or minor in another department or program.

Checklist for the minor in Greek

Each minor course must be taken for a letter grade, and students must have an overall grade-point average of 2.0 or better. Successful completion of the minor is indicated on the transcript and diploma.

 

HONORS PROGRAM

The Honors Program is open to all departmental majors with a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.5 in departmental courses and an overall G.P.A. of 3.25 or better. Students with lower GPAs may petition for admission to the program, but these grade-point averages must be achieved before graduation in order to qualify for Honors. Students who wish to do Honors should plan to take Classics 191 in their junior year, although this is not a formal requirement. To qualify for graduation with Departmental Honors, students must (1) have a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.5 in departmental courses and an overall GPA of 3.25 or better; and (2) complete Classics 198A and 198B with a grade of A- or better. To qualify for graduation with Departmental Highest Honors, students must (1) have a cumulative G.P.A. of 3.85 in departmental courses and an overall GPA of 3.65 or better; and (2) complete Classics 198A and 198B with a grade of A.

Classics 198A and 198B

Honors students are expected to have experience at writing a seminar paper (Classics 191 or an equivalent undergraduate seminar) before beginning their Honors thesis. Students must enroll in 198A and 198B in consecutive quarters, in which they write a thesis under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Students may take 198A and 198B concurrently or be exempt from Classics 198A only by approval of the Faculty Undergraduate Adviser and supervising faculty member. In Classics 198A (two units; In Progress grade) students submit an annotated bibliography and preliminary outline of their thesis. In Classics 198B (five units; Letter grade only) students submit at least one initial draft and final revised version of their thesis. Only Classics 198B may be applied for the upper-division Classical Civilization requirement in departmental majors.

Students who are interested in Departmental Honors should consult with the Faculty Undergraduate Advisor in the beginning of their junior year for advice on potential topics, faculty supervisors and program requirements.

For titles and short descriptions of Honors theses written in the department since 2010, click here.

 

CAPSTONE SEMINAR (CLASSICS 191)

The Capstone Seminar is offered twice a year, usually in the fall and the winter, and is required of all majors in the Classics department (minors may take the seminar with the approval of the instructor). The aim of this seminar is to provide an intense and focused research experience for a small group of majors in their junior or senior year. The seminar meets for three hours once a week and is focused on allowing students to consolidate and build upon the skills and knowledge they have gained over the course of their major. Students in the Capstone Seminar will be expected to present in-depth reports in class and to submit a substantial final paper or project. Students will be given the opportunity to engage in primary texts and/or materials and secondary scholarship in a sustained way. The subject of the Capstone Seminar varies according to the interests and specialties of the professor teaching it. This class may only be taken after Classics 10 & 20 and four upper division courses in the major have been completed. Please contact the Faculty Undergraduate Advisor to discuss your plan of when to take Classics 191. This course may only be enrolled in via a PTE number distributed by the Student Affairs Officer.

 

Capstone Seminars Offered by the Department since 2009

Winter 2009: The Immortal Experience, Professor Alex Purves

Spring 2009: Hadrian: the Enigmatic Emperor, Professor Robert Gurval

Fall 2009: Exploring your Multi-media Metis in the Transformed Polis of Aristophanes' Birds and Ecclesiazusae, Professor Ann Bergren

Winter 2010:The Age of Constantine, Professor Kathryn McDonnell

Fall 2010: Image and Text, Professor John Papadopoulos

Winter 2011: The Tradition of the Trojan War, Professor Sarah Morris

Fall 2011: Writing the History of Sexuality, Professor Amy Richlin

Winter 2012: The Other Plays of Aeschylus, Professor Alex Purves

Fall 2012: Dreams in Greek Culture, Professor David Blank

Winter 2013: The Body in Tragedy and Comedy, Professor Giulia Sissa

Fall 2013: The Ancient Novel, Professor Mario Telo

Winter 2014: Ancient Languages, Professor Brent Vine

 

ADVISORS


FOR INFORMATION CONTACT:

 

TANYA KIM
Student Affairs Officer
Dodd Hall 212A
(310) 206-1590
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Professor ALEX PURVES
Faculty Undergraduate Advisor
Dodd Hall 247M
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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What can I do with a Classics major?

Please click here to see a list of the career paths of our most recent Classics graduates. You might find useful and encouraging this article and this article as well.

How do I sign up for a Classics major or minor?

See Tanya Kim (contact info above) to sign up. The process is very easy and you may declare a major or minor at any time.

Can I study Classics abroad?

Yes, there are many options available to you for studying Classics abroad. Contact UCLA's Study Abroad program or see Professor Gurval for more information. The History dept. offers summer sessions in Rome and Greece as well.

How can I meet other Classics students, and get to know the faculty better?

Join the UCLA Classical Society. We host events on and off campus, including Pizza lunches, theater trips, and trips to the Getty Villa. You can also meet people and find out about upcoming courses through the UCLA Classics Students Facebook page.

Which language should I take to fulfill my language requirement for the CC major? Greek or Latin?

Both languages are stimulating and extremely rewarding, and by the end of a year in either course you will be reading ancient texts in the original. Some students find Greek more challenging in the first year, and if you have little experience with languages or little understanding of the rules of grammar you may find Latin is a better choice. Elementary Greek and Latin classes (Greek and Latin 1-3) are team-taught by a faculty member and graduate students or by two graduate students. Each class is capped at 40 students and divides into two sections capped at 20. Each fall Latin 1 regularly offers three classes at different times for enrollment; Greek 1 offers only one. In reality, it doesn't matter which language you learn, or learn first, - both are equally fascinating and have equally loyal fans. Just take your language(s) sooner rather than later!

I'm considering graduate school in Classics, which courses should I take?

Start learning Greek and Latin as early as possible. You are expected to have at least 3 years of both Latin and Greek in order to begin a graduate program in Classics. Think also about taking a course, such as CL 191, with enough time so that you will be able to submit a writing sample with your application. Graduate school applications are due Dec through January and most require a personal statement, a 15-20 page writing sample, a transcript, and 3 letters of recommendation.

I would like to write an honors thesis. How do I plan for this?

If you have a professor in mind so much the better. Make an appointment to speak with them about your proposed thesis. Plan well ahead of time. Take CL 191 in your junior year.

Can I take an exam to pass out of the Greek or Latin requirement?

We now offer an exam for Greek or Latin in the first or second week of the fall and either winter or spring quarter. You should contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it if you are interested in taking either one, as the exam is offered at these times only on an as-needed basis. The exam tests material that a student would be expected to know after Latin or Greek 3. It is comprised of a test of Latin or Greek forms, translation of sentences with questions about form and syntax, and translation of a paragraph of Latin or Greek text. The exam takes 3 hrs and no dictionaries or other aids are allowed. Please note that this exam is quite challenging and many students find it difficult to pass.

What is the lowest grade at which UD Classics courses may count toward the major?

A grade of D- or above counts toward the major. A 2.0 overall major GPA is required for graduation.

What is the maximum number of UD classes taken *outside* the UCLA Classics department that can be counted towards the major?

Four

What is the maximum number of UD classes taken *outside* the UCLA Classics department that can be counted towards the minor?

One

When should I take Classics 191 (capstone seminar)?

in your junior or senior year. We offer CL 191 twice a year, usually in the fall and winter. If you plan to go on to graduate school in Classics, consider taking it in your junior year, if you can, so that you will have a writing sample ready to send to schools in the fall of your senior year. If you wish to write an honors thesis, you should also take CL 191 in your junior year.

I cannot enroll for Classics 191. The system says I need a PTE number. What is that?

A PTE (or "permission to enroll") number allows you to sign up for a class. All students for CL 191 should contact the Student Affairs Officer for a PTE.

I am not a Classics Department major. Can I still take Classics 191?

If you are a minor and you have completed the prerequisites you may approach the professor about taking this course. The course is closed to all other students.

 

USEFUL LINKS FOR CLASSICS MAJORS

Careers for Classists in Today's World

The Winner: A Liberal Education. Room for Debate. New York Times

Classics Majors Find their Future in the Past

Choosing a Humanities Major

The Humanities in the Marketplace

Why Aspiring Spies Should Study Classics

Perseus: Texts and Resources for Classicists

Classics Confidential

 

This page is maintained by Alex Purves